Blog

Allegiance to Gratitude

On the Onondaga land, shaped by the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, school children begin their day not with the Pledge of Allegiance but with the Thanksgiving Address. They begin their days by expressing their gratitude to all members of the natural world. It begins…

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A Better Economy

I am a partner in a real estate company that tries to provide affordable housing to families living in the Atlanta area. With rising interest rates, I’ve noticed an interesting shift in the business that’s causing me concern.  Typically, when securing a mortgage, you work with a company to lock in an interest rate that’s guaranteed during a designated period while you and the mortgage company are getting the paperwork in place. Lately, I’ve noticed multiple mortgage companies suddenly losing paperwork. Or they can’t get appraisals finished by the deadline…. Read More

A Life Well-Lived

New York Times guest essay writer Tim Urban wrote an article about how we spend time in our lives. He created a graph with circles, each representing a week in the life of someone who would live to 90 years old (see below).  Urban says, “It often feels like we have countless weeks ahead of us. But actually, it’s just a few thousand — a small-enough number to fit neatly in a single image. Once you visualize the human life span, it becomes clear that so many parts of life… Read More

Let Them Grow Together

Each day, the war in Ukraine battles on, bringing more heartbreak and violence for all involved. While all eyes are on that conflict, we also remember that of the 197 countries in the world, generally one-quarter of them are in conflict at any given time. Our impulse towards violence with our neighbors seems a never-ending human challenge. While wars have been fought to achieve the freedoms and peace some of us enjoy this day, the deepest parts of us know that war is not a redemptive act. War is never… Read More

Write Your Testament

I am away on an eight-day silent retreat at the beautiful Eastern Point Jesuit Retreat Center in Gloucester, MA. This time grants me space to quiet myself and listen for that “still small voice” of the Sacred. Each day we practice the spiritual exercises taught by St. Ignatius. We pray, read scriptures, quietly reflect on their meaning for our lives and celebrate Mass each day. I am not Catholic, but I do find the structures of these days meaningful, helping create space for contemplation. The Jesuits have a prayer book… Read More

Wisdom Finds Us

Buddhist meditation teacher Jack Kornfield tells the story of a young man who was desperate to become enlightened. He traveled to a monastery and talked with a teacher.  “If I really focus on becoming enlightened, how long will it take?” he asked.  “For you, it will probably take ten years,” said the teacher.  “Ten years? But I will make this the focus on my life. I will commit everything I have to becoming enlightened,” said the young man.  “Then for you, it will probably take twenty years,” said the teacher. … Read More

In Defense of Empathy

In a Washington Post opinion piece, legal scholar and President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Sherrilyn Ifill, talked about racism as a national security crisis. She observes that our willingness to label one another as enemies lets our biases animate our policies, consumer choices, and media preferences, leaving us all vulnerable to foreign actors who play upon our fears and hatred of each other. As a legal scholar, Ifill’s concern today is how legislative bodies at the state level are passing anti-Critical Race Theory laws. When you read… Read More

Where Are We Wounding Each Other?

Sociology and cultural studies teach us that groups of people define themselves mainly by who they are not, what they are against, what beliefs they do not hold, what behaviors they do not practice. They define themselves in the negative – against another group, issue, ideology, or politic. Their identity requires a problem or an enemy. They need someone to oppose to act with any force in the world. Living by what we are for, what we support, who we love, what we cherish is harder to sustain. Its boundaries are more porous, and it’s welcome… Read More

Why Do We Choose War?

Friends, you have been so wonderfully patient as I took a two-month break from writing these meditations to focus on getting TWO books written and ready for publication. Clearly, I lost my mind. Ha! But soon, you will see updates about these projects as they become available from the publishers. Now, let’s resume our meditations together. I am excited to be back. Cameron We rejoin one another in the midst of a devastating war launched by Russia against the Ukrainian people. We’ve been watching heartbreaking images of innocent civilians thrust into the… Read More

An Opportunity for Transformation

Reposted from A Daily Meditation from the Center for Action and Contemplation Author and CAC teacher Brian McLaren has spent decades thinking about change in the church and why so many resist it. Here he summarizes what often happens to our religious institutions once they lose their original purpose: The pattern is predictable. Founders are typically generous, visionary, bold, and creative, but the religions that ostensibly carry on their work often become the opposite: constricted, change-averse, nostalgic, fearful, obsessed with boundary maintenance, turf battles, and money. Instead of greeting the… Read More